“East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity”

  • March 30, 2017 • 4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
  • Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Courtroom.

Approximately three-quarters of a century ago, it was inconceivable for anyone to think that Germany was not well within its legal right to tell the League of Nations, as Joseph Goebbels did in 1933, that it can “deal as we see fit” with our “opponents,” and in particular, “our Jews.”

Inconceivable, because the twin concepts of crimes against humanity and genocide – now considered among the bedrocks of international human rights law — had yet to be conceived. The story of how these ideas were formed, then transformed into law, replacing the long-held belief in the absolute power of sovereignty, is a searing and thrilling tale of two law students’ obsessive search to bring perpetrators of the Nazi Holocaust to justice.

Philippe Sands, the British international human rights lawyer, scholar, and prolific author, now brings this story to life in his 16th book, “East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity.”