Sue Vice

By WashU on September 7, 2018 in Art & Architecture, Fall 2018, Humanities

One of the many research interests of Sue Vice, who teaches contemporary literature, literary theory, culture, and film at the University of Sheffield, is the representation of the Holocaust. As this year’s Holocaust Memorial Lecturer, Vice will draw on her extensive knowledge of the varied forms of Holocaust literature and film that have entered the […]

Marilynne Robinson

Marilynne Robinson

By WashU on September 6, 2018 in Fall 2018, Humanities

Sponsored by: Center for the Humanities; Interdisciplinary Project in the Humanities, John Danforth Center on Religion and Politics For the acclaimed author Marilynne Robinson, religion is one of the most profound aspects of American life. As such, religious themes inform much of her fiction and nonfiction. She is currently completing a book on the Old […]

Tarana Burke

Tarana Burke

By WashU on September 6, 2018 in Education & Society, Fall 2018

Due to the anticipated interest in attending Tarana Burke’s event, please note the following restrictions regarding seating: • The main floor will be reserved for current WU students, faculty and staff. All others will be seated in the balcony. • Chapel doors will open at 3 PM. • Reserved seating for co-sponsors will be held […]

Stephen Legomsky

Stephen H. Legomsky

By WashU on September 6, 2018 in Current Global Issues, Fall 2018

Reacting to the Trump administration’s announcement this summer to detain migrant families together instead of separating parents from their children, Stephen Legomsky, a recognized authority on U.S. and international immigration law, noted that detaining families at the border makes no sense and worse, is inhumane: “Jailing a migrant family together is better than tearing the […]

Robert Sagastume

Robert Sagastume

By WashU on September 6, 2018 in Current Global Issues, Fall 2018

Robert Sagastume’s journey, from arriving in America as an adolescent on a visa, to becoming undocumented, to receiving rights under the DACA law, and finally, obtaining a green card, illustrates the challenging plight of children caught in America’s immigration morass through no fault of their own. At the age of 12, Sagastume entered the U.S. […]

Nicole Cortes

Nicole T.S. Cortes

By WashU on September 6, 2018 in Current Global Issues, Fall 2018

Nicole Cortes got her first glimpse into the St. Louis Latino community as an undergraduate, and in doing so, discovered that there weren’t many Spanish-speaking lawyers around. Determined to add one more to the mix, Cortes earned not only a law degree from WashU but also a masters degree in social work. She also became […]

Katie Herbert Meyer

Katie Herbert Meyer

By WashU on September 6, 2018 in Current Global Issues, Fall 2018

Even before the U.S. imposed new restrictions for asylum seekers and refugees, the path to citizenship or legal residency for immigrants has been circuitous at best; there is no “line” to get in legally. Even those who enter our country legally find their future and safety are anything but guaranteed, with the resulting need for […]

Karen Musalo

Karen Musalo

By WashU on September 5, 2018 in Fall 2018

In a “New York Times” op-ed piece published in May 2018, Karen Musalo and co-author Jane Fonda wrote: “In recent years, the United States has been something of a beacon of hope for women fleeing violence and persecution in their home countries. In 2014, in a giant step forward, immigration courts explicitly determined that a […]

Qui Xiaolong

Qiu Xiaolong

By WashU on September 5, 2018 in Education & Society, Fall 2018

Co-sponsors: First Year Center, University Libraries ”Picture a boy of 19, still slumbering in the limbo of adolescence, having heard nothing but revolutionary blather about patriotism, Communism, ideology and propaganda all his life, falling headlong into a story of awakening desire, passion, impulsive action, love, of all the subjects that had, until then, been hidden […]

Christine van den Wyngaert

Christine Van den Wyngaert

By WashU on September 5, 2018 in Education & Society, Fall 2018, Social Justice

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute, which established the International Criminal Court (ICC). Located in The Hague, The Netherlands, it is an independent judicial body with jurisdiction over persons charged with genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. On this anniversary that created an independent judicial body for […]