Education & Society

A brief rundown of Adam Foss’s early years shows a trajectory that aligns with his choices as an adult: Born in Columbia and adopted by an Irish-American family from Massachusetts; experienced childhood as one of color in a small town; arrested at age 19 for marijuana possession but got off …
Christine van den Wyngaert
This year marks the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute, which established the International Criminal Court (ICC). Located in The Hague, The Netherlands, it is an independent judicial body with jurisdiction over persons charged with genocide, crimes against humanity, and war …
eddie huang assembly series
Eddie Huang's story is at once singular and universal, for many children of immigrants must find their own way within two often conflicting cultures, but he forged his own path to success. Now he tells his own story: The story of a bright, brash and ambitious Taiwanese kid who never allowed anyone to define him.
In 1987, Washington University welcomed its inaugural class of 11 John B. Ervin Scholars. Thirty years on, more than 600 Ervin Scholars have graduated, and many of them will converge on campus to attend the 30th anniversary conference.
Throughout her long tenure in the Jackson County prosecutor’s office, Baker has served in nearly every unit. In 2012 she was elected as its leader. Baker is known as a fearless and compassionate advocate for the victims of crime, especially the young and most vulnerable, and for partnering …
Gardner was elected St. Louis Circuit Attorney in 2017, after serving as a Missouri House Representative from the 77th District. She received national attention last year for her role in pursuing the investigation into alleged unlawful activities by Missouri governor Eric Greitens, leading …
Melvin Oliver’s long and distinguished career has been devoted to understanding and addressing the complex factors that contribute to deep racial disparities in wealth. On Wednesday, Sept. 16, he will give a talk on “Income and Wealth Inequality.” The lecture will be held at 4:30 p.m. in Anheuser-Busch Hall, Bryan Cave Moot Courtroom.
The proliferation and popularity of podcasts – especially among millennials – have created many new media stars, but few are shining as brightly as Barbaro, the host of The Daily, the New York Times’ entry into the podisphere with millions of devoted listeners. It was the most-downloaded new …
NOTE: Due to the anticipated large turnout, seating for the public will be limited. Doors open at 4:30 PM – seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. A book signing will follow his talk. Through his several books on the growth, preparation and consumption of food, Michael Pollan has …
British archaeologist Mike Parker Pearson and his research team had unprecedented access to Stonehenge and its surroundings, and his research findings are replacing centuries of speculation with facts. He will share them at an Assembly Series program at 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 27, in Steinberg Hall Auditorium.
Qui Xiaolong
Co-sponsors: First Year Center, University Libraries ''Picture a boy of 19, still slumbering in the limbo of adolescence, having heard nothing but revolutionary blather about patriotism, Communism, ideology and propaganda all his life, falling headlong into a story of awakening desire, …
robert sussman
“The anthropological concept of culture is extremely important and often misunderstood because many of the things that are assumed to be biologically determined, like criminality or homosexuality or IQ, are really behaviorally and societally defined.” This quote from Robert W. Sussman, PhD, professor of physical anthropology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University, forms the basis for his Phi Beta Kappa/Sigma Xi Lecture. “The Importance of the Concept of Culture to Science and Society,” part of the university’s Assembly Series, will be held at 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 9, in Steinberg Hall Auditorium.
The James E. McLeod Memorial Lecturer, Roderick Ferguson, discussed "The University and the Combinations of Heart and Mind" on September 29, 2014, in Umrath Hall Lounge. The McLeod Lecture is presented annually by the Center for the Humanities and addresses topics concerning diversity and higher education.
In Stephen Prothero's talk, "Why Liberals Win: America's Culture Wars from the Election of 1800 to Same-Sex Marriage," he asserts that religion lies at the heart of our American identity and, unless we become religiously literate, it will continue to divide us as a nation.
Tarana Burke
Due to the anticipated interest in attending Tarana Burke’s event, please note the following restrictions regarding seating: • The main floor will be reserved for current WU students, faculty and staff. All others will be seated in the balcony. • Chapel doors will open at 3 PM. • Reserved …
Ferguson Councilman Wesley Bell’s recent upset of Robert McCulloch’s 28-year-run as St. Louis County Prosecutor was a stunning victory for the underdog running on a platform to reform its criminal justice system. This January, Bell became the first African American prosecutor in St. Louis …
assembly series F2016 newfield
“It (a college education) changed everything for the family. It changed their economic position but it also changed their sense of the world; new possibilities opened up, there was more pleasure and leisure in their lives. There was also more innovation at work and at home. There was more value created for the economy and there was also just more of a sense of the possibilities of ordinary life for themselves, and they passed that along to their children.”
On April 14, 2015 at 5 p.m. in Umrath Hall Lounge, veteran journalist Carla Power talked about "Reading the Quran at Starbucks: An American Secular Feminist and a Traditional Muslim Scholar Find Commonalities."
On February 26, 4:30 p.m. in Graham Chapel, Radiolab hosts Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich talked about "Celebrating Curiosity - Celebrating Arts & Sciences."
On February 17, 2015 at 6 p.m. in Graham Chapel, Reza Aslan, delivered the Washington University Foreign Policy Engagement Lecture on faith, extremism and democracy.
On September 30, 2014, Ruth Simmons, the 18th president of Brown University and the first African-American president of an Ivy League university, talked about "The State of Conscience in University Life Today."